Dottorato in Informatica (ultimo ciclo attivato 28° - anno 2013)

Corso a esaurimento (attivi gli anni successivi al primo)

Lectio Magistralis “Guardians at the gates: sensing and signalling in plant stomata” - Prof. Steven Neill

Periodo
26 febbraio 2009 - ore 15.00 Sala Verde - Dipartimento di Informatica

Cicli in cui è offerta

22° ciclo
22° ciclo
22° ciclo
22° ciclo
23° ciclo
23° ciclo
23° Ciclo
23° Ciclo
24° ciclo
24° ciclo
24° Ciclo - Neuroscienze
24° Ciclo - Scienze Psicologiche e Psichiatriche

Descrizione

Stomata are the pores found on the surfaces of plant leaves that open and close via the swelling and shrinking of the highly specialised guard cells, two paired cells that border the stomatal pores. Gas exchange in plants – the uptake of carbon dioxide and the simultaneous loss of water vapour – is determined by stomatal apertures. Stomata are also the points of entry into leaves for plant pathogens such as various bacteria and fungi. Stomatal aperture is therefore a major determinant of plant productivity. Not surprisingly then, stomatal guard cells have evolved as exquisitely complex homeostatic sensory and effector cells. They detect various stimuli such as light, CO2 and various chemicals that are transduced into the functional responses of cellular swelling or shrinking. Because of the guard cell’s specialized structural features, these volume changes result in opening or closing of the stomatal pores, thereby increasing or decreasing gas exchange. In my lecture I will outline some of these processes with a particular focus on two molecules, abscisic acid (ABA) and nitric oxide (NO), which are research topics at UWE Bristol. ABA is a key stress hormone in plants that is synthesized in response to drought stress and that induces stomatal closure and hence water conservation. NO is a universal signalling molecule that is now recognized as being of fundamental importance in plant biology, due in no small part to work in the Delledonne laboratory in Verona. Research programmes addressing the synthesis, metabolism and functioning of these two molecules have used physiological, biochemical and functional genomics approaches to illustrate their central importance to many biological processes, including stomatal movements. Moreover, the outcomes of this research have particular relevance to agricultural biotechnology

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